David Stokes
Today, the Institute for Justice (IJ) filed suit in federal court in Saint Louis to overturn Missouri's awful licensing system for women who wish to perform African-style hair braiding. Why is this particular licensing rule so objectionable? Because, while there are many other unnecessary occupational licensing regulations in Missouri, at least the others usually require you to do things that at least relate to your future professions. With African-style hair braiding, the required cosmetology coursework, training, etc., has absolutely nothing to do with hair braiding. It would be like requiring dog walkers to get an electrician license before they can walk dogs. It simply makes no sense.

Watch a clip from today's press conference about the issue, and check out some of the Show-Me Institute's prior work. I applaud IJ for taking up this cause in Missouri. More importantly, I applaud the two plaintiffs, Tameka Stigers and Joba Niang, for standing up for their chance to pursue their dream of owning their own business without unnecessary government interference.

About the Author

David Stokes
David Stokes was a policy analyst at the Show-Me Institute from 2007 to 2014 and was director of development from 2014 to 2016.